Independence Day!

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Today is Independence Day, the day we celebrate our nation’s freedom. Now the American Signing Community has another reason to celebrate: American Sign Language is now free from the shackles of English!

How to Write American Sign Language is part of a new beginning, one where we can finally record our native thoughts for posterity. Technology at its best is still hard-pressed to replace the faithful motions of our hands, so this book is specifically designed to provide the best writing surface for pen and pencil. It is built for a tactile experience.

Each chapter in this book has clear photographs and illustrations, along with ample practice space. It is a fantastic self-contained course for study at home, or for use in the classroom.

Preorders are now open at the Store. Order an individual book or packs of 5 to learn with your friends!

Happy Fourth of July!

7 Comments on Independence Day!

  1. Bob
    07/04/2012 at 3:33 pm

    I fail to understand why you reinvented the wheel, over 50 years ago William Stokoe, Dorothry Casterline and Carl Croneberg with support from Gallaudet, National Science Foundation and American Council of Learned Societies. produced a very comprehensive and NOT copyrighted written language for ASL.
    A rather well written book was published by Gallaudet press (Library of Congress 65-28740) with this written langauge well laidout. Personally I find it much easier to write, but have found little use for it…
    So I guess the question would be, why would you go to the trouble to do something that has already been done, and personally I think more comprehensive with fewer symbols, which they refer to as “Tab” “Dez” and “Sig”
    You appear to have done a lot of work and the book appears to be well written. but I don’t think there will be much use for it, and personally from what I have seen a bit confusing. I suspect you could have written a book on “How to write American Sign Language” using the already developed gliphs and developed on the work of others and have better results rather than starting over.

    not trying to throw cold water, but rather a comment from an oldtimer.

    Bob

    Reply
    • Adrean
      07/04/2012 at 3:57 pm

      This is Stokoe Notation, transcribing a line from Goldilocks and the Three Bears:

      Stokoe Notation

      Compare with the first line of Clayton Valli’s Dandelions in written ASL (si5s):

      Si5s Dandelions

      Notice how Stokoe borrows from English and written ASL (si5s) is based on ASL itself?

      Reply
      • Bob
        07/04/2012 at 5:29 pm

        would be interested to see the same text transcribed not differing text,
        also both transcribe into SEE not ASL.

        Bob

        Reply
        • Adrean
          07/04/2012 at 5:36 pm

          Yes, it would be interesting to see the same text side-by-side, but it will not make much difference compared to the above examples.

          The Valli example is exactly what he signed in the Dandelions poem. It is not SEE.

          Reply
          • Bob
            07/04/2012 at 6:31 pm

            nor would the Stokoe be SEE if transcribed correctly.

            since I can’t read Valli I could not tell one way or the other.
            I do not believe the transcription into either SEE or ASL would be alphabet dependent but rather in how it is transcribed, was it the correct grammer etc. but that could also be done with plain text english words.

            Bob

    • Adrean
      07/04/2012 at 4:01 pm

      Also, to be clear — the text in the book is copyrighted, not the language. This is standard for all books.

      Reply
      • Bob
        07/04/2012 at 5:29 pm

        good, misread it.

        Bob

        Reply

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